Resistance for Acceleration

Sprinting has been described as consisting of a series of phases: an acceleration phase (typically the first 10 metres), a transition phase, and a maximum velocity phase.  For sports such as soccer, rugby, hockey, football and basketball, maximum velocity is not always attained, and repeated short sprints are more common.  Taking this into consideration, the ability to develop speed in as short a time as possible (acceleration) may be of high importance to many athletes.  It has been proposed that acceleration and maximum velocity are relatively separate and specific qualities.

An athlete’s ability to accelerate his or her body during sprinting is dependent on several factors.  These factors include technique and the force production capability of the body, in particular the leg muscles.  It has been shown that the technical aspects may have less importance for the acceleration phase of performance than for a typical sprinting event.  For example, in many sports the athletes have to accelerate from a lying or crouching position, from landing on 1 leg and pivoting, from catching a ball, and so on.  Therefore, the force capability of the muscle may be more important in improving acceleration of the athlete.  This point was supported by R. Mann in his publication titled “The Elite Athletes Project: Sprints and Hurdles.” which stated that the ability to perform well in sprints over short distances is dependent on the ability to produce large amounts of force at crucial times.

A variety of methods are used to enhance force output.  These methods include resistance training, plyometric training, and assisted and resisted sprinting techniques.  For this article we will focus on resisted sprinting which involves athletes sprinting with added load.  This load can come in different forms: weighted vests, sled-sprints, uphill sprinting and limb loading.  More specifically, this article will focus on the towing of weighted devices such as sleds which is the most common method of providing towing resistance for the enhancement of sprinting.

It has been shown that the use of towing as a form of resistance may increase the load on the athlete’s torso and therefore require more stabilization.  This training stimulus may increase pelvic stabilization, leading to a positive effect on sprint performance.  Increased torso loads also cause an increased upper-body lean and increased thigh angle at both the beginning and the end of the stance phase.  This increased thigh angle reflects the increased need for force production during the prolonged stance phase.

It is important to note that sprinting speed should not be decreased by more than 10% when adding resistance; adding too much resistance may alter running kinematics in ways that are not desirable.  It is also maintained that sled-sprinting should not be employed when the desired training effect is neural (i.e. maximal velocity).  Sled-sprinting is an effective method for a metabolic training effect (i.e. acceleration).  Due to evidence that only the first 10 metres of a sprint have been designated as the acceleration phase, it is suggested that sled-sprints should be performed for distances no longer than 10 metres.

S.S.T. holds that a well implemented speed program should include a variety of methods to achieve desirable results (i.e. resisted sprints, assisted sprints, unassisted sprints and resistance training).  Also, methods such as resisted and assisted sprints should be used sparingly, such as in the final or next-to-final block of an athlete’s periodized program.

REGISTER HERE for SUMMER SPEED CAMP!

 

BTW – If you missed last week’s piece “To Squat or to Power Clean, that is the question?” CLICK HERE to see it.

 

What to Look for in a Strength Coach/Personal Trainer?

If you are just getting into the spirit of using a strength coach or personal trainer and want to know what to look for, hopefully I can offer some advice. I have been in this field for over 14 years and have seen a lot. I’ve traded new information with colleagues, and used mentors and libraries of information to learn what I now know. But the learning never stops! I am always seeking what is best for my clients.

Many people have asked me what to look for when hiring a strength coach or a personal trainer; I think the answers are the same in either situation.

I used to think education was the most important credential and trust me I believe this lays down the foundation of the science of personal training which is very important but not the only thing to look for.  I have seen many good coaches who don’t have a post-secondary degree have success but I have seen many more trainers who have a degree and then take a 2 day course and now think they are EXPERT personal trainers after one weekend!

Here are some of the attributes I think a client should look for:

Passion

I have just returned from a speaking engagement and workshop in cloudy southern California (June Gloom!) where a couple of things really stood out.   On the first day I had the pleasure of teaching 50 personal trainers about Functional Applied Speed Training for Power Systems.

I was overwhelmed and surprised by the passion and love for training and knowledge these coaches exhibited.  Some had come from as far as Canada and New York all the way to California for a full day of learning.  Right away (8 am) the audience was engaging and very receptive to learning.   Never once did I have to beg for a volunteer, in fact I had to beat them away with a stick when we went into the practical sessions.  This is what I call passion!

The next day I was fortunate to pair up with a good friend and great strength coach, Scott Prohaska.  He had arranged for the training of 15 athletes, ranging from Olympic bobsledders to division one football players to rep baseball players.  Coming into this I knew all these high -level athletes would have passion, but the passion from Scott was amazing.  Not only was he encouraging, but he tried every drill I put each athlete through.  At the end of the session he told me that he has brought in many people in to speak with his athletes and was pleased to report that his athletes told him that they enjoyed the day mainly due to my passion and the fact that I was right there in the trenches with them. This is what I love to do!

Later that day Scott and I went for dinner and discussed how many hours we work per week?
70-80 hours was the answer.  I have asked many professionals, in other fields, the same question and they often admitted to working similar long hours. When I ask why they work so many hours each week,  the common answer was not just that they have so much work to do, but rather, that they love what they do. You can actually see the true passion in their manner.  People who are successful  put the time into their field of work, but the ones who are truly dedicated, do it for the love of it! Their passion shows, in fact it oozes out of them – because you can not fake passion!  As one of my clients, JoAnn, says “Love it!!”

See my recent video on this point: Video I – Passion CLICK HERE

Leave your Ego at the Door!

This is probably one of the most important ideals, and one of the most difficult for many coaches to acquire.  I see big egos every time I travel and watch other coaches teach.

Let’s use my friend Scott for example. His strength is his ability to help his clients get strong . . . he does a GREAT job at this, but he understands his limitations, in this case, speed training. What did he do but seek out someone to help him and his athletes.   He left his ego at the door!

I did the same thing for some of my female clients when I discussed nutrition and training with top physique coach, Francine from Montreal. Her insight was tremendously productive in helping my female clients achieve success.   I often bring in nutrition experts such and Caryn from Biotics Nutrition to teach the SST staff, enabling us to better help our clients.  Again I remind you, your trainer should be able to leave ego at the door!

Remember the bottom line is that strength coaches and personal trainers are here to help you.  Whatever it takes, coaches should try to ensure the best for their clients.

We, as coaches and trainers, all like to boast about our clients’ successes and sometimes market them (before and after stories),  but remember this (and I tell all my parents and athletes this):  You are the one who committed yourself to the project and you must be the first one to put forth a great effort .  Our trainers are ready to work hard for you, and you must be ready to work too.   I just wrote up a program to encourage you to reach your goals . . . you and your trainer’s best efforts!

 

Continuing Search for Educational Resources

Consider the strength coaches who attended this past seminar. They took time from their busy schedule to spend a whole day to better their techniques.   They are determined in their search of new educational information.  Next time you are looking for a trainer/coach ask how many seminars and what other types of education they take part in. At SST, the minimum goal is to attend one new seminar each month to better ourselves. Even if I only discover one new thing, both my client and I will be better for it.

These last few weeks, I have been reading books, articles, DVDs and anything I can get my hands on regarding cancer and nutrition.  Why?  One of my clients has been diagnosed with cancer and I feel an obligation to do the best I can to help him get better.  This is the kind of dedication I look for when hiring strength coaches.

Another good friend, one of the most learned nutritionists in the world, John Berardi spends countless hours researching and discovering new information about the human body.  He has PASSION which leads him to the never-ending search of new and important information; the ongoing search for education!  Why do you think he is the best?   Passion and education!

So next time you are looking for a trainer/coach, don’t be afraid to ask them questions as if you’re conducting a job interview; which you, in fact, are.

See my recent video on this point: Video III – Continued Education CLICK HERE

Results

Yes, results are the bottom line. Why do you think the TV show, Biggest Loser is such a hit? People are getting results and that’s what everybody wants!  Most people want instant success. If a coach tells you that you can drop 20 pounds in two weeks, be very leery. Success takes a lot of work, as in anything worth while, and there are no short cuts. So don’t expect shortcuts in weight loss or training either.

Ask your coach or trainer what successes they have had, and be specific. If you are a female client ask about successes with female clients.  If you’re an athlete, ask about who the trainer has helped?

Do you see a theme here?  The best coaches all have passion; all exhibit a keen interest to learn more in an endless study of research; a good coach stashes his/her ego. All these combined will give the client excellent results.   Notice I did not mention certification?  The reason for this is that some trainer certifications are done on line or through a weekend course (some are actually pretty good) Now, this is better than nothing I guess, but imagine dealing with a doctor who received his accreditations at a weekend seminar.  Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to get certification but the trainer/coach must still continue their education throughout their lifetime.

So, when looking for a good coach/ trainer please ask these questions and remember you will only get the results you want from the effort you and your trainer put into it.  Some Coaches may only be working with you for two hours a week.  So get off the couch, get ready for summer, and find yourself a great coach!

See my recent video on this point: Video II – Results CLICK HERE

For more information and access to great articles and videos please visit www.sst.training

Larry Jusdanis

Owner, Sports Specific Training

www.sst.training

To Squat or to Power Clean, that is the question.

With Olympic lifting at an optimal high in training facilities, I ask the question – to squat or to power clean?

What’s better? I know any good strength coach like Charles Poliquin,  Dave Scott-McDowell and Scot Prohaska and will say it depends upon their program. I then ask, why do some coaches who I believe get their certificate over a weekend (more on this later, or see my article on What Makes A Good Strength Coach) preach power cleans for close to 100 reps when we know that this is a technical lift and high reps increase the breakdown of form?

Squats are a staple in many successful athletes’ programs, and for a reason: too MANY people are too weak for their speed. “Strength is an essential component of all human performance and its form development can no longer be neglected in the preparation of any athlete.”

As Mark Rippetoe states in Starting Strength, “Physical strength is the most important thing in life.”

What does that mean? People need to get under a bar and squat!

Squats are what I call a slower strength movement (obviously there are some speed variations, but for this purpose we will focus on back squats), or more at the maximal strength component of the strength speed continuum, aka force velocity curve.

As you can see in the diagram above, squats’ emphasis is on maximal strength and strength speed during dynamic training days. Some variations of squats that would emphasize different phases of the force velocity curve are:

Back / front / safety squats for maximal weight – maximal strength

Back / safety squats with bands – shifts more to strength speed

Back squats with bands – traditionally strength speed and depending upon load closer to speed- strength

Jump squats – dependent upon weight – at SST we emphasize speed during this exercise and have our athletes NEVER exceed 25% of bodyweight as their load for their day. If you are in doubt, ALWAYS aim for the lower weight and increase speed during this exercise

Cleans

The power clean and its variations… pound for pound, the power clean and cleans are great exercises when performed properly, and this is where the issue lies. Cleans are a component of Olympic lifting and a sport in itself, which many coaches and athletes neglect. It takes thousands of hours to become proficient. There are many qualified coaches who are able to coach this lift properly, but unfortunately there are way more that have no clue!

An example of this is a client of mine who won the North American Masters Javelin championship. After performing an assessment, I discovered many imbalances such as unable to fully squat, but what dumbfounded me more was that he told me his trainer had him proficient in power cleans. I said, “OK, go ahead and please show me with light weight.” he must have seen the sheer terror in my eyes after his rep and asked what was wrong. Quickly I said, “We have a few things to work on prior to cleaning again.”

The Clean is a tremendous exercise that falls in the strength-speed and speed-strength continuum dependent upon load. When coached properly, an athlete will see tremendous gains in athletic ability such as jumping and sprinting. Power cleans and variations of cleans are exercises that allow one to  “Jump with weight.” Sometimes as coaches and athletes we neglect this aspect, but the underlying premise is, it’s still a loaded jump.

One of my biggest concerns, and this is with many lifts, is that athletes want to lift more and more weight independent of their form. I prefer to use cleans as a speed strength exercise to improve jumps and speed only. With squats I shift our focus to more of a maximal strength and strength speed exercise. As stated earlier, most athletes are too weak for their speed, thus the focus should be on maximal strength and the king of this is squats and other variations.

Another variable to consider when comparing cleans to squats is that the power clean teaches more timing and synchronization of motor units, whereas the squat is more of a BEAR DOWN and sweat, or what I call “Get under the bar and lift” type of exercise. I know there are some more technicalities regarding the squat such as position, application of force, etc., but the rate of force production and synchronization is greater in the clean.

So let’s get back to our original question: to squat or to clean? What is right? It all depends. If you find you are too weak for your speed, then squats should be the focus. In fact, one of my top strength coaches, Antoine Hamelin, has a rule: if a person cannot squat their own body weight, they squat 3–4 times per week!

If you are too slow for your strength, then cleans may be the better choice. I witness this with athletes who have powerlifted. But do remember this: Athlete A, who squats 500 lbs, will always be able to clean more than an athlete who only squats 200 lbs.

In my next article I will discuss the importance of full squats for sprinting.

 

Verkohoshansky and Siff; Supertraining; Sixth edition – expanded version.

Larry Jusdanis is the owner of Sports Specific Training (SST) the #1 rated speed program in Canada! 

For more information about Sports Specific Training’s SUMMER speed  programs please

CLICK HERE

 

 

Road to D1 – Week 2

Hello all,

I hope everyone is enjoying the beautiful summer weather that we are having! We are very excited about the Road to Division 1 Football update.

If you haven’t seen the start of this journey please click here.  In this blog post we are going to explain the first phase Kyle has been preforming in his preparation or camp in August

Our focus was twofold- increase Kyles rate of force development and lower his body fat.  His program was mixture of Cluster sets to focus on his overall strength, and with our 60% max workout to increase his speed and quickness. The speed aspect of Kyle’s game was the part that needed most improving.  Kyle has days that he is lifting heavy (cluster) (90-100%) of his max and days were he is working speed and quick twitch working only (55-65%) of his max lift. Kyle is getting in 9 grueling workouts per week.  He is training currently two times a day at 8am and 3pm Monday-Thursday and one work out on Friday. To see the last 4 weeks of Kyle’s program PLEASE CLICK HERE

With Kyle hitting this much volume, his diet is so incredibly important. We needed him to lose body fat which he has, but maintain his strength levels. Kyle is on a low carb/high fat diet that has produced some great results.  He has slimmed down from the 315 to 290 pounds and looks very impressive. THE BIG MAN ALMOST HAS ABS POPPING THROUGH!

One of his concerns was not to lose strength…In fact his strength went up but more importantly his overall speed has increased!

Here are some impressive numbers from his body fat calculations. These results came from 8 weeks of work, 4 weeks of general preparation and 4 weeks on the first phase of his program.

  1. Down 24 pounds in 6 weeks
  2. Down 31.3% in the Subscap area (Back)
  3. Down 26.6% in the Midaxillary area (Side)
  4. Down 27.2% in the Supra-illiac area (Love Handle)
  5. Down 11.8% in the Umbilicus area (Belly)

Below you will see Kyle’s full body fat numbers. In 8 weeks he went from 23.6% to 21.4% in total body fat which is awesome! Take this stat in the average body fat for an NFL offensive lineman is about 24.8% so Kyle is keeping pace with pro athletes and let me tell you he is just as strong! I will also attach Kyle’s program, look out for the next update!

We are excited about our upcoming High performance summer camp following the same principals Kyle has worked on in the last 8 weeks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GET STRONG

MORE POWER

AND SPEED SPEED SPEED!!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR OUR 8 WEEK PROGRAM

Beef Short Ribs Ragu, with Kale

Beef Short Ribs Ragu, with Kale

Ingredients

  • 5 lbs Beef short ribs. Bone in
  • Salt & pepper
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup of each
  • Mirepoix (equal parts, Onion, Carrots and Celery)
  • 1 tbsp Minced garlic
  • 1 cup Red Wine
  • **Optional: 1 tsp crushed red pepper
  • 3 cups Beef or Chicken stock
  • 2 Lg Cans Quality plum tomatoes crushed
  • 1 Sm Can Quality tomato paste
  • 2 cups Chopped kale (remove stem first before chopping leafy greens)
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 (or 2) Packages ofFettuccini
  • Shaved Parmesan for garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350˚

  2. Over medium high heat, in a large dutch oven place olive oil

  3. Season meat generously with salt and pepper and place into dutch oven to brown. Caramelizing the meat adds a ton of flavor so please don’t skip this step.

  4. Do not over crowd the pan, please do the browning in stages to maintain the heat
  5. Reserve browned meat separately and add the mirepoix to the dutch oven to sauté. Ideally, we are looking for a light caramelization. Near the end of this stage add in the minced garlic being careful not to overcook.

  6. Add crushed tomatoes to the dutch oven with the vegetables

  7. Add in the tomato paste and allow to cook for a few minutes to marry the ingredients together

  8. At this point add in the red wine, the stock and return the meat to the pot to cook. Bring everything to a simmer (light boil)

  9. Place into the preheated oven to cook for 3hours.

  10. Each hour remove from oven and stir so any meat on the top will not burn

  11. Once cooked. Allow to cool slightly so the rib bones can be removed. Please take the time to shred the meat

  12. Strain out the vegetables and add to the reserved shredded meat. At this point I would recommend removing as much grease from the remaining sauce. As it will detract from the taste, use a fat separator or spoon. I realize this seems like one step too many but the final product makes it worthwhile

  13. Add all ingredients together to complete the RAGU

  14. Please cook the chopped kale over medium high heat to wilt. Season with salt and pepper

  15. Cook pasta as package dictates

  16. Combine ingredients to finish your dish and top with shaved parmesan

Squat to Stand – OL

One of the most underrated attributes of an offensive lineman is flexibility. This can often get lost when evaluating an athlete because they can be so big and so strong. When you get to the higher levels, the first test they want to see offensive athletes perform is an overhead squat. A lot can be said about an athlete when looking at how good of a squatter they are; it can give insight on athletic ability and their range of motion to determine if they can take the pounding that football places on your body. I have discussed with many college coaches it is very easy to get players stronger and faster, it is much more difficult to get them more flexible. That’s why with all of my offensive line athletes I constantly make them do a movement called Squat-to-Stand.

This movement works by doing the following

  1. Reaching down and touch your toes (or as far as you can)
  2. Then letting your but slowly come down to the squat position. Keeping you chest up nice and big.
  3. Followed by putting one arm up at a time above your head
  4. Then standing up
  5. Repeat 2 sets of 12

I preach to the kids that they should be doing this before every single one of their workouts and a couple sets before they go to bed at night. If done over a period of time you will definitely see an improvement in lower body flexibility.

Jamie Lalonde

thebigchill@sstcanada.com

How to improve your 40 yard dash- Part 1

If you want to go places in football, then you had better work on your 40 yard dash. While the forty yard dash is probably the most overrated test, it’s also the test that most coaches rely on when scouting a player. Given the emphasis that is placed on this one test, I am surprised at how many athletes come to combines and camps unprepared. I see athletes wearing the wrong shoes or the wrong clothes and I can tell that many of them don’t know the proper starting technique or running mechanics. Furthermore, it’s obvious that most players haven’t done any effective speed or strength training leading up to the big day. I tell my athletes that they have to consider the forty yard dash as a job interview that could land them a scholarship or millions of dollars when their stock goes up in the draft. Remember that first impressions mean everything, so plan ahead and be prepared to run like a professional. Don’t get me wrong, running a great 40 yard dash doesn’t mean that you’re automatically a great football player, but it will turn heads and give you the chance needed to show universities or professional teams what you can do on the field.

When training for the 40 yard dash, players tend to forget how important it is to be STRONG! I have yet to see a weak player run a great forty yard dash. As a Sports Performance Coach I know through personal experience that players who speed and strength train on a continuous basis will experience dramatic gains over those who only focus on speed training. One athlete who followed SST’s 12-week speed and strength training program went from a 5.05 to a 4.62 at the National football combines this year.

There are three main factors that SST considers when designing a strength training program for football players who want to decrease their forty yard dash time. First, we assess the player’s experience and abilities. Factors such as age, previous training experience, fitness level and amount of time available for training are considered. Next, we evaluate the player’s 40 yard dash to determine weaknesses. Do we need to improve his start, decrease his ground contact time or work on reaching maximum speed? Lastly, we focus on strengthening the player’s weakest muscles. As a general rule SST has found that football players tend to have weak lower back, hamstring and VMO muscle (VMO, or vastus medialis, is the teardrop muscle found on the inside of the quadriceps), therefore for the purpose of this article we will highlight , what we believe to be, the top six exercises designed to strengthen these muscles.

In Part I of this two part article, I will explain the first three exercises: snatch grip dead-lifts, tire flipping and Olympic lifts and their derivatives. These exercises strengthen lower back and hamstring muscles which are key components for achieving maximum speed.

Exercise #1 – Snatch Grip Dead-lifts

If I had to choose only one strength training exercise to improve a player’s 40 yard dash time, I would pick snatch grip deadlifts because they work the entire posterior chain (lower back and hamstrings). Snatch grip dead-lifts are a bit different than your traditional deadlift in that they recruit more of the hamstrings due to the angle of the trunk and a wider grip.

Results: improve start, increase maximum speed

Description: Starting position- feet are shoulder width apart. Grip is wider than your traditional grip. Elbows are turned out. Shoulder blades are retracted. Knees over the bar. Chest and shoulders over the bar. Lower back is arched. Initiate lift with hamstrings and lower back. Maintain lower back arch throughout. Keep bar path straight.

Variations: snatch grip dead-lifts off a podium, snatch grip dead-lifts with chains and traditional dead-lifts.

Exercise #2 – Tire Flipping

Tire flipping is not your traditional weight room exercise but it’s a functional way to develop the posterior chain (lower back and hamstrings). This is a grueling exercise that has lot of return for its effort.

Results: improve grip strength, decrease 40 time (after 12 weeks SST athletes decreased their 40 time by up to 3 tenths)

Description: Start in a deadlift position and grab the tire from underneath (fingers under the tire). Lift the tire using your legs and pop your hips forward. Flip your hands around (palms on the tire) and push the tire away from you in an explosive manner. You must keep your back arched throughout the entire movement to prevent lower back injuries.

Exercise #3 – Olympic Lifts and Derivatives

Olympic Lifts consist of power cleans, hang cleans and snatches. These exercises must be done explosively which means as fast as possible. The amount of weight doesn’t matter as much as the speed of the bar. Of all the Olympic lifts the snatch uses the most muscles in the body. People tend to shy away from this exercise but I have found it to be the most effective and easier to teach than cleans. In order to achieve maximum results and avoid injury it’s important to employ proper technique and use the right weight when performing Olympic lifts. If you are not familiar with Olympic lifting and their derivatives call your local weightlifting club or email me at sst@sstcanada.com

Results: faster starts and less ground contact time

Description: An explanation of hang snatch from thigh will be provided because it is the most applicable. Starting position – feet are shoulder width apart. Grasp bar with hook grip. To determine the distance between hand placements measure your elbow to elbow distance with arms straight out to sides. From this point move the bar explosively from thighs by extending the hip, knee and ankle joints in a jumping action. This is also known as “triple extension” of the joints. Keep the bar close to the body. This is a very important element and should be perfected. At maximum plantar flexion (up on the balls of the feet), shrug the shoulders, flex and pull with the arms. Pull the bar as high as possible. As the bar reaches maximum height, flex and then rotate elbows around and under the bar. Then fully extend the elbows and lock the bar overhead. Catch the bar with knees and hips flexed and squat down slowly and under control. The hang snatch is a complicated exercise that should only be performed in the presence of a qualified coach.

In Part II, I will explain the remaining three exercises that focus on increasing VMO strength: squats with chains, wobble board split squats and sled dragging. Strengthening the VMO muscle will help decrease ground contact time which is vital in order to increase speed. The less time a player spends on the ground, the faster he’ll be!

Larry Jusdanis is the owner of Sports Specific Training Inc. SST has trained thousands of athletes from a variety of sports. SST’s no nonsense approach to training has been used by thousands of athletes’ from a variety of sports all over the nation!

Larry Jusdanis

Owner, Sports Specific Training

Sstcanada.com

Director of the National Association of Speed and Explosion (NASE)

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DAWG’S – 3 tips for BELLY FAT LOSS- Part 1

This is the time of year everyone is on the New Year’s Kick and their resolution. As many of you know I am not big believer of this and offer specials etc.

Why? It takes 30 days to form a habit and 80% will fail.

One of main reasons is that people like to be accountable to someone (I will have more on this later)

Tip 1

Can’t eat after 7pm and not again till noon the next day

Why is this important- 2 reasons:

  1. Intermittent fasting (IF) works- I believe we as a society indulge too much – right or wrong. I am not saying that you can’t indulge but I inform my clients that they can indulge 20% of the time.

Some of the benefits of IF include:

  • Improves insulin sensitivity.
    • The body becomes more sensitive to the effects of insulin… less insulin secretion per meal… lower blood glucose and insulin levels!
  • Promotes autophagy.
    • Regular bodily process where damaged, old, and dysfunctional proteins are consumed by the body. Think of renovating your kitchen, you need to tear away all the old culverts before installing new ones!

  • Elevates Growth Hormone production.
    • GH is very important hormone for body composition, because it releases stored fat and preserves muscle during fasting.

 

  • Reduced systemic inflammation
  • Inflammation occurs in the body after exposure to a variety of stimuli, including viruses, injury, certain foods, and even exercise. Chronic inflammation is a precursor to atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and other harmful diseases

A great method when using IF is too fast for 24 hours once per week- doing this will melt that body fat!

Tip 2- Increase GH levels

Another reason I firmly believe that you need to stop eating at 7pm for reason #3- Increased Growth hormone (GH) production.  Elevated GH production burns body fat!  The best methods to increase GH are thru intermittent fasting, sleep and strength training!  If you are having a hard time sleeping maybe review your eating habits at night- any sugar consumption late at night STOPS GH production!

Tip 3- SLEEP!

A long term study (16 Years!) of more than 68,000 women found those who slept less than 5 hours per night were significantly more likely to gain weight than those who slept 7 hours or more per night. In fact, the women who slept less than 5 hours per night gained 30 or more pounds over the course of the 16-year study period

Sleep is so important for increased GH production and decreased cortisol levels.   We have already discussed the importance of increased GH levels.   Lack of sleep increases cortisol production as it is a major stressor on your body.   An increased level of Cortisol has a direct correlation with storage of abdominal fat.  I have some bad news for Women who already have bigger midsection – they tend to produce more cortisol. SORRY!!

As we mentioned in the intro – Goals are better achieved with accountability.  Especially, with Nutrition and fitness. One way to help you this is my NEW VIP Fat Loss program.  You will work personally with me and only me to achieve your results in 12 weeks.  What else is great about this: I want you to join with a friend – 2 for 1!   Thus you have TWO people to be accountable too…trust me it works.  The only limitation is this- I can only take on 8 clients- 8 ONLY- If you are interested please private message me at ljusdanis@sstcanada.com.

To find our more details please click here (write up will come).

Next week I will bring you part 2 of the Dawg’s tip of Belly Fat loss!

QB Canada – What the Dawg looks for in a qb?

In a series of blogs I will review what I and many other coaches in the pros and college are looking for in a QB.  Let’s be honest we all perceive the QB position to be glamorous and at times it is.  In all truthfulness QB’s have a lot of expectations and demands on them.  To the point where people may think they are over maligned.

Unfortunately this is not going to go away and this leads me to what I look for in a qb.  I have had the privilege to coach some great ones including Nathan Rourke, Dan Brannagan and Michael Faulds.  Other than their exceptional physical traits one thing stands out about these qbs and top level qbs:

TOUGHNESS and I do not only mean physical toughness but more mental toughness.   Qb is not an easy position to play. The demands more so mentally are draining but the good ones are able to handle this.   How can we develop toughness?

  1. For every action there is a consequence- as a QB more so then any other position. What I like to do in practice sessions is demand more from my qbs then a game.  How do I do this…one way is to expect perfection on all on air throws and sessions.   Why?  If a qb can’t handle the pressure of just throwing on air without a defense, how can I trust them in a game against 11 players trying to take their heads off?
  2. Off season training- IT’S a must – I expect my qbs to be first and last out of each session. I want them to be the leader of their team.  This starts in their off season workouts.

Next week’s blog I will discuss some of the physical traits that’s a must for a qb to be successful.

To find out more about my upcoming qb camp and private sessions please private message me.

Larry “Big Dawg” Jusdanis

ljusdanis@sstcanada.com