Baked Avocado fries.

Baked Avocado Fries

Baked avocado fries are coated with a delicious almond crust. The creamy chipotle dipping sauce is a must! Give this paleo and gluten free recipe a try!

Ingredients

  • Avocado fries:
  • Avocado oil spray
  • 1 large avocado ripe but firm
  • 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 1/2 teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 egg
  • Chipotle Dipping Sauce:
  • 1/4 cup avocado oil mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle pepper sauce

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Line a rimmed baking dish with parchment paper and spray the parchment with oil.
  2. Cut the avocado lengthwise and twist the halves to separate. Remove the pit with a spoon. With your fingers, gently peel the skin off. Cut the peeled avocado into wedges, as shown in the video below.
  3. In a small bowl, mix the almond meal, kosher salt, garlic powder and chili powder.
  4. In another small bowl, lightly beat the egg.
  5. Dip each avocado slice in the beaten egg, then dredge in the seasoned almond meal on all sides. Use one hand for the egg bowl and the second hand for the flour.
  6. Place the coated avocado fries on the prepared baking sheet. Lightly spray them with avocado oil. Bake until golden, about 15 minutes.
  7. Meanwhile, make the dipping sauce by mixing the sauce ingredients in a small bowl.
  8. Remove the baked avocado fries to a serving platter. Serve immediately, with the chipotle dipping sauce.

Exercise Boosts Immunity, What to Know About Working Out Right Now, According to Experts.

You know how to protect yourself against the novel coronavirus by now—frequent handwashingsocial distancing, and maintaining a balanced diet to keep your body as healthy as possible. But another important aspect of supporting your overall health can also come in handy right now to boost your immune system: regular exercise. The simple act of moving your body more can provide a powerful tool for fighting infection.

So, how can exercise boost your immune system?

The CDC and WHO still encourage regular exercise—and for good reason. In addition to improving your mental health, a 2019 scientific review in the Journal of Sport and Health Science found that exercise can improve your immune response, lower illness risk, and reduce inflammation.

The study looked at “acute exercise,” meaning that of moderate to vigorous intensity lasting just under an hour. Study author David Nieman, DrPH, a professor in the department of biology at Appalachian State University and director of the university’s Human Performance Laboratory says that typically, people only have a small number of immune cells circulating around the body. Those cells prefer to hang out in lymphoid tissues and organs like the spleen, where your body kills viruses, bacteria, and other microorganisms that cause disease.

Because exercise increases blood and lymph flow as your muscles contract, it also increases the circulation of immune cells, making them roam the body at a higher rate and at higher numbers, says Nieman. Specifically, exercise helps to recruit highly specialized immune cells—such as natural killer cells and T cells—find pathogens (like viruses) and wipe them out. In Nieman’s 2019 review, participants who took a 45-minute brisk walk experienced this uptick of immune cells floating around the body for up to three hours after the walk, Nieman explains.

While you do get an immediate response from your immune system when you exercise, that will eventually go away—unless, that is, you keep working out consistently. “If you go out for 45 minutes of exercise the next day, this all happens again,” Nieman says. “It all adds up as time goes on.” In fact, another study from Nieman and his team—this one published in 2011 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine—found that those who exercised five or more days of the week lowered the number of upper respiratory tract infections (like the common cold) over a 12-week period by more than 40%.

Think of the lasting immune effect of exercise like this, Nieman explains: Say you have a housekeeper come over to clean your home for 45 minutes most days of the week. The house will look a lot better on that first day than if someone never came. But the more frequently the housekeeper comes back, the better and cleaner the house will look. “Exercise really is a housekeeping activity, where it helps the immune system patrol the body and detect and evade bacteria and viruses,” Nieman says. So, you can’t necessarily exercise one day here and there and expect to have an illness-clearing immune system. Come back for more movement on the regular, though, and your immune system is better prepared to wipe out sickness-causing germs. This holds up, even as you get older, according to another 2018 review article published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology.

Another benefit of exercise is that it decreases inflammation in the body—which, in turn, can also improve immunity. In fact, some research, like the 2004 study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, links decreased levels of inflammatory markers to those that exercise more often and have higher fitness levels. And Nieman says that goes hand-in-hand with immunity. “When immune cells try to function with inflammation, it puts the immune system in a chronically inflamed state too,” he says, which makes it harder to fight infection. To cut down on inflammation, kick up your activity level.

Strength training helps your immune system. Adam Jajtner, PhD, CSCS, assistant professor of exercise science and physiology at Kent State University, who has also studied exercise and the immune response, touts resistance training as a smart strategy for improving immunity. However, he does caution against over-training.

Like all good things in life, science says you can overdo exercise. Pushing yourself too hard for too long can actually put you at higher risk of infection—but you have to go pretty far past that “acute” level of training to experience negative side effects.

For example, most studies that found that extreme exercise can increase risk of illness examined marathon runners, like Nieman’s 1990 study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. But Nieman says this negative effect can come into play if you’re running at a high intensity for at least a half-marathon distance or cycling or swimming at a tough pace for about 90 minutes. Any of these longer, more intense activities can cause stress on the body that could lead to lowered immune function. “You put yourself in a stressful state, so your immune system reflects that and leads to dysfunction that can last anywhere from a few hours to a few days,” Nieman says. Basically, high-intensity activity for more than an hour might not be the best idea right now if you’re really focusing on keeping your immune system in top shape.

Exactly how long and how hard you can push yourself before you reach that excessive and intense level of exercise ultimately comes down to how well you’re trained, but you might want to focus on maintenance rather than intensity in these pandemic times. “Moderate intensity is the best route right now, but maintaining that activity, in some form or fashion, is going to be key,” Jajtner adds.

Nieman views this pandemic as a golden opportunity to start a regular walking program—a time to nail down the habit of frequent physical activity. While other lifestyle habits like eating fruit, managing stress, and getting quality sleep can also help reduce risk of illness, Nieman says exercise is potentially “the most powerful habit that people can adopt right now as we’re coping with this new and novel virus.”

If you’re super new to exercise (and have your doc’s approval to start a fitness program), Jajtner suggests going out for even just 10 minutes, two to four times a day. Then work on gradually increasing that time. If you’re in a crowded city and have fewer opportunities to get outdoors.

Even if you are exercising, don’t forget that your best defense against getting COVID-19 is limiting your risk of catching it by practicing social-distancing and frequently washing your hands. “Reducing your exposure to the virus is number-one, it rises above everything,” Nieman says. “Social-distancing and good hygiene must always be paramount…but I can’t emphasize enough the importance of everyone being healthy and focusing on good immunity too.”

The information in this story is accurate as of press time. However, as the situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to evolve, it’s possible that some data have changed since publication. While we are trying to keep our stories as up-to-date as possible, we also encourage readers to stay informed on news and recommendations for their own communities by using the CDCWHO, and their local public health department as resources.

Sources :Use fitness to your immune system’s advantage—here’s how.By Mallory Creveling, ACE-CPT April 16, 2020

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/20888836_Infectious_episodes_in_runners_before_and_after_the_LA_Marathon

Cherry Chocolate goodness shake!

Cherry, chocolate goodness shake!

Research suggests that cherries can ease soreness after a workout, making this a perfect recovery shake

Ingredients

  • 12 oz water milk, or yogurt
  • 2 scoops chocolate flavored protein powder
  • 2 cups of sweet dark cherries pits removed
  • 1 cups of spinach
  • 1 tbsp of walnuts
  • 1 tbsp ground flax
  • 1 tbsp cacao nibs or dark cocoa powde

Instructions

  1. BLEND

Recipe Notes

530 calories, 56 g protein, 13 g fat, 47 g carbs, 9 g fiber (accounts for using water as the fluid instead of milk or yogurt)

Summertime blast watermelon smoothie.

Summertime Blast

The combo of melon, basil, and pineapple makes the shake super refreshing,

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup seedless watermelon
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 cantaloupe
  • 1 banana
  • 1/4 cup pineapple
  • 2/3 cup ice
  • 4 to 5 fresh basil leaves

Instructions

  1. BLEND

Recipe Notes

182 calories, 3 g protein, 1 g fat, 47 g carbohydrates, 5 g fiber

Paleo Chicken tenders with avocado-cilantro dip

Chicken Tenders With Avocado-Cilantro Dip Recipe

Course Snack

Ingredients

  • 1 1 ⁄2 lbs chicken tenders cut in half lengthwise
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tbsp homemade Sriracha sauce optional
  • 3 ⁄4 cups almond flour
  • 3 ⁄4 cups coconut flour
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 ⁄2 tsp onion powder
  • 1 ⁄2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 large avocado
  • 1 ⁄2 cup fresh cilantro packed
  • 1 green onion sliced
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Juice of 1 or 2 limes
  • Sea salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 425 F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Whisk the eggs and Sriracha sauce together in a small bowl until well incorporated.
  4. In a shallow bowl, mix together the almond flour, coconut flour, garlic powder, paprika, onion powder, cayenne pepper, salt and pepper.
  5. Dip the chicken into the egg mixture, then transfer to the flour mixture and coat well.
  6. Shake off any excess flour and arrange a single layer on the prepared baking sheet.
  7. Repeat with the remaining chicken tenders.
  8. Once all of the chicken tenders are on the baking sheet season with salt and place in the oven.
  9. Bake for 15 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through, flipping the tenders once in-between.
  10. While the chicken is in the oven, place all of the ingredients for the dipping sauce into a food processor. Start with the juice of 1 lime.

  11. Blend until smooth and all ingredients are blended, stopping to scrape the sides with a spatula as needed.

  12. Taste and adjust with more lime juice if needed.

  13. Transfer to a bowl and store in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

  14. The dip will stay good stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Recipe Notes

Special thanks to http://paleoleap.com/ for the recipe!

3 Reasons Why Bench Press and Baseball Don’t Mix

Bench Press and Baseball are like Oil and Water; they do not mix.

Working with mainly male, High School and College age, Baseball players, I get a lot of grief about not including Bench Press in programs. Especially, when they see the Football and Hockey players doing it.

When I ask them why they want to bench press so badly I get answers such as; “it’s fun”, “I like lifting heavy” and my personal favourite, “it looks cool”.

It is widely accepted in the baseball world that the reward of getting strong on Bench Press is outweighed by the risk the exercise poses to the shoulders and elbows. My exclusion of Bench Press is not because I want to keep you from ‘looking cool’ at the gym. There are specific and scientifically proven and accepted reasons as to why overhead athletes should avoid this exercise.

Hopefully, this blog will also reach some of the NCAA college programs down south. It BOGGLES my mind when Baseball players in Division 1 Baseball programs come back with Bench Press in their strength programs! No, I am not kidding. It happens…all the time…

Here are 3 reasons Baseball athletes should avoid Bench Press:

  1. It Exacerbates Negative Adaptations Acquired from Throwing

When you throw thousands of baseballs every year there are a few things that typically happen to the body:

  • Increased glenohumeral (shoulder) external rotation
  • Decreased glenohumeral (shoulder) internal rotation
  • Decreased elbow extension
  • Decreased scapular (shoulder blade) upward rotation
  • Decline in the quality of the tissues surrounding the shoulder girdle
  • Abnormal spinal curvature (usually in the thoracic and lumbar areas)
  • Decreased hip mobility

In laymen’s terms:

  • Your shoulder gets loose in the front
  • Tight in the back
  • Elbow doesn’t straighten all the way
  • Your shoulder blade doesn’t move well
  • The tissue around your shoulder is gritty
  • Your spine it hyperextended
  • And your hips don’t move

Not a pretty picture. And how does Bench Press help this situation…

IT DOESN’T!

Bench Press actually causes stresses to the body that are extremely similar to those found during a throwing motion:

  • Spinal extension
  • Scap retraction and depression
  • Humeral (upper arm) movement without scaps
  • Heavy loads placed on the shoulder girdle

In any sport we use the off-season to re-establish proper movement patterns and mobility, give our arm/shoulder time to rest and correct instabilities and dysfunctions. So why would we want to perform an exercise that does not allow this to occur and can actually exacerbate these dysfunctions?!

Much of exercise selection for athletes comes down to a risk vs. reward. Is the reward (strength gains) worth the risk the exercise places on my athletes? When it comes to Baseball players and Bench Press the risk FAR outweighs the benefits.

  1. There is Little Direct Transfer to Playing Baseball

Another factor in exercise selection is specificity to the sport. Does this exercise mimic anything the athlete is doing while they are playing? To decide this we need to look two things:

  1. The plane of movement of the exercise
  2. Where the movement falls on the force-velocity curve.

Research shows us that power development is highly plane-specific. Meaning that many traditional sagittal plane power movements (vertical movements such as; jumps, sprints, cleans, snatches) have little transfer into throwing. Frontal and transverse plane movements (lateral and rotational) have much more correlation (skaters, medball throws and banded rotations). So, while Bench Press may be a great exercises for an athlete in shot put or kayaking it has little use for a Baseball athlete.

Thanks to our hunting ancestors, humans have mastered the throwing motion. And it has been widely recognized that pitching is the fastest articulated motion a human can produce! This puts throwing a ball at the velocity end of the force-velocity curve. It is a very light load moved incredibly fast. Whereas the Bench Press movement is at the other end; a heavy load moved slowly. The movement is too removed from any movement that occurs in Baseball and therefore, will have little impact on performance.

 

  1. The “Meat Head” Factor

Let’s go back to the reason’s my Baseball athletes give for wanting to Bench Press:

  • It’s fun
  • I like to lift heavy
  • It looks cool

People (especially young, hormone driven males) have a tendency to overestimate their strength capabilities while Bench Pressing. I have done it myself and I have seen countless others do it as well.

 

If my number one goal as a Strength Coach is to keep my athletes healthy and second goal is to improve their performance then I need to choose exercises that are going to keep their inner meat head at bay!

Bench Press done with heavy loads and poor technique can put their most prized possession, their shoulder, in a very vulnerable position. Yes, people will argue that any exercise done with high load carries risk. However, a failed rep in a Push-up has less risk than Bench Press. Risk vs. reward!

“So, watch your athletes and make sure they use proper technique”.

Okay, valid point. However, have you ever tried to coach multiple athletes at one time? Even on my best day it is impossible to see EVERYTHING on the gym floor. And any coach that tells you different is lying.

As a coach I have to pick exercises that are self-limiting, safe and effective, whether I am watching them every second or not. This can mean different things for different sports, positions and individuals. Hence, why I may program Bench Press for a Football athlete versus a Baseball athlete. Have I mentioned risk vs. reward yet?!

The exclusion of the bench press in our baseball programs goes beyond “it’s dangerous for your shoulders.” Even if coached and performed perfectly, our athletes won’t get as much transfer from it as they would from other pressing exercises.

Check back for Part 2 of this Blog where we discuss pressing exercises that are much better suited to baseball players and other overhead athletes!

Email Bskinner@sstcanada.com to book your personal training sessions and shake off quarantine!

Chicken Roti

Chicken Roti

Trinidad Chicken Roti- An incredible chicken meal that would excite your taste buds. Rich in spices, chickpeas and potato-So easy to make and comes together quickly.
Course Dinner
Cuisine Caribbean
Servings 5 people
Calories 333 kcal

Ingredients

  • Chicken Marinate
  • 2 1/2 -3 pounds chicken skinned thighs cut in bite-sized pieces
  • ½ teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon curry powder
  • ½ teaspoon chicken bouillon powder
  • Chicken Roti
  • ½ cup canola oil
  • 1 large onion diced
  • 2 Teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh or dried thyme
  • 1- teaspoon cumin spice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 2-3 tablespoon curry powder
  • 1- teaspoon ground nutmeg spice
  • 1 can of chickpeas drained
  • 1- tablespoon bouillon chicken powder
  • 2 cups of cubed potatoes
  • ½-1 teaspoon cayenne pepper optional
  • 1- teaspoon white pepper.
  • 3-4 cups chicken broth/water
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Place chicken in a large bowl or sauce pan
  2. then add salt, garlic, thyme, white pepper and curry powder
  3. Mix chicken with a spoon or with hands until they are well coated, set aside in the fridge and marinate for 30 minutes or overnight.
  4. When ready to cook, heat up large sauce-pan with oil, and add onions, garlic, thyme, cumin spice, all spice, smoked paprika, nutmeg and curry powder, stir occasionally for about 2-3 minutes until onions is translucent.
  5. Then add chicken, stir and sauté for about 2-3 more minutes. Add chicken stock if necessary to prevent any burns
  6. Next add chickpeas, chicken bouillon, potatoes, cayenne ,white pepper, and chicken broth. Bring to a boil and let it simmer until sauce thickens, it might take about 20-30 minutes.
  7. Adjust for salt, pepper and thickness with more more broth.

12 Reasons You Always Feel Hungry; Part 2

Just in case you missed part 1 of the blog, click here to get the first 6 reasons!

Reason 7. You are Drinking Your Diet

Soda, fruit juice, sugar added to coffee or tea are some of the most sugar laden foods you can consume! And you can easily consume hundreds of calories and an incredible amount of sugar in just 1-2 cups. Refer to reason #1 for why consuming high amounts of sugar is making you fatter.

And don’t think that choosing the ‘diet’ option is any better for you. Artificial sweeteners – such as sucralose, aspartame, or saccharin – can actually increase your appetite for real sugar. When you consume sugar there is a decrease in the amount of ghrelin (hunger hormone) and insulin (hormone that removes sugar from the blood) which causes a feeling of satiety. The problem with sweeteners is that they taste sweet but do not cause decreases in ghrelin or insulin, therefore, we crave more sugar to actually help reduce these hormone levels in our blood stream.

How to Change This Habit:

This one is simple, cut them out of your diet! There is no way around this one, sugar laden or artificially sweetened drinks are one of the worst things you can consume if you are trying to lose weight. Substitute for water and if you want more flavour to your drinks infuse them with lemon, limes, cucumber, or fresh mint for all the flavour and none of the sugar! Drinking extra water will also help stave off those hunger feelings.

Reason 8. You Eat Low-Fat Options

Starting in the 1980’s the ‘no-fat’/’low-fat’ diet craze swept across the food landscape. Manufacturers from Heinz to Kellogg’s began producing and marketing low-fat and no-fat everything. And consumers began chowing down! The thought: ‘It’s healthy, right?’

Wrong. Dead wrong.

The low-/no-fat craze is actually making us fatter & hungrier! Fat is not only an essential nutrient that we need to survive but it also provides food with palatable flavour and texture. When fat is removed food tastes like cardboard! So how did manufacturing companies combat this…SUGAR! Loads and loads of sugar!

A typical 126mL low-fat yogurt can contain up to 44g of sugar! That is 101% of your daily-recommended intake! If you refer back to Reason #1 you will remember that refined sugar not only spikes and crashes our blood sugar levels, causing us the feel hungry and crave more sugar but excess sugar that cannot be procced properly will turn to fat.

How to Change This Habit:

Eating healthy fat will NOT make you fat, it will actually help aid in weight loss. No, I am not lying to you. Fats takes longer to break down in your stomach and helps control blood-sugar levels, leaving you more satisfied and reducing your cravings.

And while it may sound counterintuitive, your body needs fat in order to burn fat! Dietary fat helps break down existing fat by activating PPAR-alpha and fat-burning pathways through the liver. But don’t run out and grab that big greasy pizza just yet; not all fat is created equal! Your fat sources should come from unsaturated sources; avocados, fatty fish, olives, nuts and seeds, omega-3 fish oil supplements and oils such as olive, flaxseed and canola in your diet.

Click here for part 3 of 3!

Chocolate Avocado Pudding

Chocolate Avocado Pudding

Ingredients

  • 2 avocados
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 4-6 Medjool dates soaked overnight or in warm water for 20-30 minutes
  • 1-2 tbsp of pure unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1-2 tbsp almond butter coconut butter or other seeds based butter (sesame, sunflower, pumpkin) 1 banana, ripe
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup Sweet dark cherries

Instructions

  1. Combine the ingredients in a blender and whirl on high until well blended into a thick creamy pudding.
  2. Divide the pudding into 2 servings
  3. Top with pitted cherries or fruit of choice

  4. ENJOY!

Recipe Notes

The combination of chocolate and avocado may be different to you, but the taste is amazing. Avocado’s give this pudding a nutritional boost, adding fiber, potassium and small amounts of protein. This yummy snack or dessert is filling and delicious!

Exercise, is it keeping our brains young?

Have you felt the effects of quarantine on your body yet? Or even on your brain? Well, there is a good reason for that. Our bodies, and brains, have been trained and specialized for activity like stalking and chasing down prey. Now, not only with the quarantine but also the way we have engineered our lives to fit us and make everything easier, our lives are made sedentary and that takes a heavy toll on our bodies: For the first time in U.S. history, younger generations are expected to live shorter, unhealthier lives than their parents.

While exercise is well known to change our bodies, researchers have long suspected the same might be true of the brain. Research into this is a little more difficult though, but why has been harder to figure out?

Few studies have really looked at what’s going on in the brain while we’re moving. Only recently has technology given scientists the ability to see what is really happening in our brains as we move. Aerobic exercises seem to change both the structure of the brain and the way it operates, which together bolster learning in kids, give adults an edge on cognitive tasks, and protect against the cognitive declines that often come with age.

Brain Waves Get a Boost

Your brain becomes much more active during exercise, Helping with attention, memory, and information processing.

Using tools like an electroencephalogram (EEG), which pick up on electrical pulses, researchers have found that aerobic exercise causes a shift in the amplitude and frequency of brain waves. More beta waves, in other words, means that exercisers may be in a more alert state.

You Become More Sensitive to the World Around You

During exercise, the brain becomes much more receptive to incoming information, leading to measurable changes in vision. The visual cortex is designed to zero in on important features in the environment—the kind of features that might indicate, for example, the presence of a predator or prey—and filter out less important background noise. It’s been found that low-intensity cycling boosted this feature-selectivity ability so the brain was able to better identify specific features during exercise.

It taken a professor of psychology and brain sciences at UC Santa Barbara four years to figure out how to consistently and reliably record an EEG while a subject is in motion.

Scientists have also administered cognitive tests right after exercise—for example, measuring the flicker fusion threshold (the rate at which a flashing light begins to look like it’s steadily glowing) and found the same thing: After exercise, one’s senses are heightened and thus can detect the flashing at a higher frequency than before exercise. Taken together, these findings indicate that people see more clearly and immediately after exercise. They can make finer visual distinctions; their perceptions are sharper.

The benefits of exercise to your brain may begin as soon as your heart rate begins to rise. In much the same way that your muscles demand more energy during exercise, the brain begins gobbling up glucose or other carbohydrates when the body is in motion.

It was previously unknown what the brain was doing with all this fuel, it’s been discovered that the brain uses some of that fuel to build more neurotransmitters, the chemicals that relay messages around the nervous system. The brain may be filling up its stores of essential ingredients, perhaps in order to deal with a sustained period of hunting. This process might be why exercise has been shown to alleviate depression and has been found that during activity, glutamate levels rise in the same region of the brain where stocks of the neurotransmitter have previously been found to be low in depressed patients.

Your Brain Becomes Younger

A few things happen in the exerciser’s brain that make the organ appear younger. Studies suggest that exercise sparks the production of growth factors that nourish new neurons and help existing cells survive. Budding neural cells also need more nutrients as they grow, and animal studies suggest that exercise promotes the release of other growth factors that promote blood vessel growth, which could deliver those nutrients. At least one study in humans has found that active individuals tend to have more and healthier blood vessels, or, in the words of the authors, a “younger-appearing brain.”

These structural changes in the brain generally take at least a few weeks to develop but lead to long-lasting improvements in regions of the brain associated with cognitive tasks, like working memory.

Beyond that, research shows that aging exercisers have increased gray-matter volume in regions associated with general intelligence and executive function, which encompasses everything from attention to planning to problem-solving skills. Studies also show that fit adults have healthier white-matter tracts—the superhighways that connect various regions of gray matter—in the basal ganglia, a critical region for balance and coordination.

So, Is Exercise Magic?

You shouldn’t expect to increase your IQ or anything of that nature, we’re talking about small to moderate effects, which are potentially great for improving cognition and brain health.

But we can envision a future in which doctors prescribe exercise instead of drugs. “Exercise is a potential prophylactic against some aspects of age-related cognitive decline,” Giesbrecht says. “When you think of the fact that we have an aging demographic and the high prevalence of depression, there might be simpler treatments out there, like exercise.” 

We know everyone is excited to get back to the gym and we cant wait to share out new facility with you all!

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Get back to the grind with you vertical jump program! your brain will thank you for it.